Sunday, September 18, 2016

Playlist

Preface

"The second aspect of the garden is a series of mental states and of corresponding corporal gestures, inscribed in memory. The fixation in memory of the sum of all the experiences that have already occurred, treating matter through body actions, allows one to recall them at any time in any order possible. We have here the notion of a walk through our physical and mental potentialities. As in everyday speech, the process of remembering is not a fully conscious act, as can be the case with written composition and the time of relection that it permits, it remains based on automatic reflex actions. It is a traveling between consciousness and unconsciousness which opens a path to an awakening ecstasy." Jean-Charles François "Dialogs of Deafening Gifted Eavesdroppers"The Open Space Magazine Issue 11 Fall 2009


Texts

Live

Steam Plant, Spokane

September 15, 2016
Chapel Performance Space, Good Shepherd Center, Seattle

Bad Luck
(from Seattle: Neil Welch and Chris Ocasanio)

surf sound
fattened, aura-ed
field revealed
quivered
shadowed inversely
saturated surf sough breath
brough
breagh
ablating rising
heatwise
application of force
power pressue
onslaught on slot
lifting pressure
pressing lifture
end of time in beach
bonfire
feedback multivalent portamento
motion of one into many
stopping smartly over over over stepping
startly crisply coily coyling stirring
trapezoidal generation unity by unity
source code all the same
root or binary roots
Spokane

(light
show
serves
as
en-
closure
sonic-
ally
per-
meable
walled
chamber
sacral
pede-
stal
sacra-
social
al-
tar)

Spill
(from Berlin: Magda Mayas and Tony Buck)

the keel of a sleeping arc
drifting deep beneath
sounding the drowned
by night
keening light
on surface expanse
personhood collection accretion
meshing tools for
chemical sand
painting
crazy-ass sandart
in sound rattlesnakeds
nakeds rattles
kora rigging harp
ship drift
buoyed (ant)
on the body of which
this
sur
face

Recorded

September 11, 2016
Banned Rehearsal 2016

Gradus 282 - Neal Kosály-Meyer [January 2016]

September 13, 2016
Die Kunst der Fuge Contrapunctus I - J. S. Bach - Zoltán Kocsis

Ringing the dynamic between independence and cooperation. It takes a village to be a fugue. And how it hangs in midair at the end, cadenced but unsettled.

Keyboard Sonata in E-flat Hob. XVI:28 - Haydn - Christine Schornsheim

Delightfully ramshackle, but all of a piece. Or: All of a piece in its image of ramshackley delight. Elbows and knees.

In Session at the Tintinabulary

September 11, 2016
Corollaries (Up's Up) 160911 - Keith Eisenbrey

In 2013-2014 I composed a set of 8 piano pieces under the project title Études d'exécution imminent. They are 17-tone serial works, all based on successive m-transforms of the same "mod 17" tone row. The original chart projected 16 or 17 pieces in the set, but after the first 8 I felt I had come to a stopping place so I took a self-imposed, and not particularly strictly observed, sabbatical from writing music. In the spring of 2015 I started working on Second Thoughts, which takes up the place of the ninth etude. That was a bit of a struggle, and took about a year and a half to complete. The four pieces that constitute this tenth etude: (Up's Up), (Down's Down), (Down's Up), and (Up's Down), were essentially complete in a week. Such are the vagaries of creative work. The recording I made on Sunday is not intended, on its own, for a reading of the piece, but as raw sonic material for an electronic arrangement I am concocting.

September 12, 2016
Banned Rehearsal 918 160912 - Karen Eisenbrey, Keith Eisenbrey, Steve Kennedy, Aaron Keyt, Neal Kosály-Meyer


As frustrating as Banned Rehearsal can be at times, over the decades, there are moments of awesome transparency, such as this. Improvisation is really too fancy a word for what is really just dinking around making sounds. Full engagement is what makes the difference.

September 16, 2016
Spokane Steam Plant Chimney Stomp 160916 - Karen Eisenbrey, Keith Eisenbrey

A chimney niche
Karen and I were staying in Spokane after dropping our oldest son off at Eastern Washington University. We had very fine dinner at Stack's at the Steam Plant, after which we were invited to explore. It felt like we had the place to ourselves, and it is truly the most visually interesting restaurant space I can remember. After a while we found ourselves in a circular room at the bottom of one of the chimneys, presumably open to the night sky a hundred or so feet above our heads. We closed the door and stomped a stomp.

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